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Earth Song

Toronto ON, area from the air

View ascending from Toronto, ON airport, June 2013

Earth Song

They call me sod
loam, dirt
clay, turf, dust.

In cahoots with rain, rocks and roots
worms and grubs
perforated by ants and moles
aquifers and oil

veined with lead, copper, gold
and hiding diamonds and coal
cables, wires and pipes

I hold your huts and your tents
your houses and barns
anchor your bridges, apartments and high-rises.

In beds below rivers
lakes and oceans
I slumber.
In the open I bask in sun’s warmth
sprout and nourish your food.

Sometimes I seizure
shudder and quake
vomit magma
belch steam and ash

or slump and ooze
tongues of brown porridge
smothering your villages and roads
in mud.

But mostly I am solid and safe
keeping you upright
with my mysterious magnetic powers.

Feed me wisely
for I ingest
without discrimination

and someday soon
you will join me.
I will reclaim you.
You will again
become mine.

© 2014 by Violet Nesdoly (All rights reserved)

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Humans have a deep and abiding relationship with earth. Our bodies consist of elements common to earth. The Genesis account of creation has God forming man from the dust of the earth (Genesis 2:7).

This poem ends with my tip-of-the-hat to what will happen someday to each of us—our bodies will return to the dust.* However, to clarify, I believe that the soul inside each of us lives on; even death cannot extinguish God’s “breath of life” that makes us living beings.

(*God’s words to Adam in Genesis: “In the sweat of your face you shall eat bread / Till you return to the ground, / For out of it you were taken; / For dust you are, / And to dust you shall return”Genesis 3:19.)

 
7 Comments

Posted by on April 22, 2014 in Nature, Objects

 

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Evil’s party (guest list)

crucify

Evil’s Party (guest list)

(after Mark 15)

Sir Accusation
Miss Envy
Madame Bloodthirst (she usually brings a crowd)
Count Rebellion & his brother Murderer
Governor People-Pleaser
The triplets Mockery, Teasing & Making Sport
Mr. Violence & sons Hitting
Spitting, Scourging and Crucifying
Misses Gambling & Greed
Sir Sarcasm & Lady Reviling
Lord Blasphemy
Queen Death
Prince of Darkness

© 2014 – Violet Nesdoly (All rights reserved)

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Those who are of the Christian faith remember Jesus’ death on the cross today–the day we call Good Friday. I wrote this poem some years ago after reading the account of Jesus’ passion from Mark 15.

Poetry Friday LogoIt is linked to Poetry Friday–hosted today by haiku queen herself, Robyn Hood Black at Life on the Deckle Edge.

 
13 Comments

Posted by on April 18, 2014 in Poetry Friday, Religious

 

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Homophoems (oh groan!)

be writingOn Monday Tricia at The Miss Rumphius Effect posted the Homophoem Poetry Stretch challenge (via J. Patrick Lewis). The task: write a two- to ten-line poem using at least one homophone. (Homophones, in case you’ve forgotten, are words that share the same pronunciation but differ in meaning.)

I’ve been writing them all week! What fun (although they do often bring on the groaning response one would get from a pun). Here are a few:

Busted

I snuck some cookies,
ate them in bed.
Mom found the crumbs—
my face was read.

- Violet Nesdoly © 2014 All rights reserved

 

Project

I’m trying out new morning food
Alpha bits, Bran and Cheerios.
Each week I buy a different box
of breakfast food in serial.

- Violet Nesdoly © 2014 All rights reserved

 

Rabbit Boutique

Luxe de lapin has most unique
accessories for rabbits:
lettuce truffles, thumper pads
baubles of many carrots.

- Violet Nesdoly © 2014 All rights reserved

 

Lover’s promise

I’ll come for you by morning
or noon or dim twilight
and if the day has got away
I’ll come to you by knight.

- Violet Nesdoly © 2014 All rights reserved

 

Lovesick

The animals cannot be blamed
for feeling a bit confused
by old ram bleating everywhere:
“I love ewe!”

- Violet Nesdoly © 2014 All rights reserved

******************

Poetry Friday LogoAre you up for the Homophoem challenge? I’d love to read yours. Add them to the comments here.

This post is part of Poetry Friday, hosted today by Michelle Barnes (greeting card poet extraordinaire!) at Today’s Little Ditty.

P.S. For those who have subscribed to get these posts via Feedburner, I’ve decided to turn off emails after getting the same email (with multiple posts) for three or four days in a row (I subscribe myself so I know what’s happening.)  How annoying! Sorry!! The subscribe button on the right sidebar will now take you to subscription options through WordPress.

 

 
17 Comments

Posted by on April 10, 2014 in Light, Poetry Friday

 

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Talking with a stranger

Happy National Poetry Month.

It’s been over a month since I’ve posted here. My time away has had its events.

Mid-February I went to northern B.C. to be with my daughter and help with the grandkids around the birth of her baby. Their lovely baby girl arrived on February 24th.

Then on March 2nd (still at my daughter’s) I had a crazy fall on some stairs and fractured my hip. Surgery the next day put everything right (I hope) though I’m still walking with a cane and not back to normal mobility (of course I’m back at home now). That’s life for you!

Again this April I’m attempting to write a poem a day. I’m using a grab-bag of prompts to help with this: Robert Brewer’s Poetic Asides blog, Adele Kenny blog The Music In It, Martha Silano’s book The Daily Poet: Day-By-Day Prompts For Your Writing Practice and others.

Today’s poem was prompted by the Poets and Writers weekly email “The Time Is Now.” This prompt is actually for creative nonfiction but who says one can’t use it for a poem?

Children are often reminded not to talk to strangers, and for good reason. As we get older, communication with strangers isn’t as dangerous, but it can still be uncomfortable. This week, think about a conversation you have had with a stranger in an awkward situation. Who started it? Did you feel safe? After talking, did you feel like you knew this person any better? Did you ever see this person again, and if not, would you want to?

On reading that prompt I immediately thought of my experience this past Monday when, after attending my physiotherapy appointment, I decided to sit and wait for hubby on the bench outside the building.

park bench

Talking with a stranger

Appointment done, the sun is out
the day is warm, the bench is long
the lady sitting there is mute
hair turbaned, leather purse is gold
she wears sunglasses and a coat.

I say, “It’s nice.” She says, “It is.”
I find my notebook and my pen.
She looks asleep but murmurs then,
“How warm is it to get today?
“Twelve or fifteen is what they say.”

Our little talk has loosed her tongue
for now the muttering has begun
not to me or anyone
within our view converses she
with ones unseen

earnestly, disgustedly
with vehemence
and sarcasm, disdainfully
while I, relieved of chat polite
can write and write and write and write.

Violet Nesdoly © 2014 (All rights reserved)

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Poetry Friday LogoThis post is part of Poetry Friday, hosted today by Amy at The Poem Farm – a farm where poetry flourishes!

 

 
15 Comments

Posted by on April 3, 2014 in People, Writing

 

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The song of birds

Silhouette of a bird singing

Birdsong silhouette (Photo © 2012 by Violet Nesdoly)

HOW BIRDS SING
by Kay Ryan

One is not taxed;
one need not practice;
one simply tips
the throat back
over the spine axis
and asserts the chest.

(Go HERE to read the rest. Scroll down a bit…)

***************

Right around the end of last year, Mary Lee Hahn offered a Kay Ryan book giveaway on her blog—and I won it! She graciously sent  The Best of It – New and Selected Poems by Kay Ryan all the way to Canada. (Thanks again, Mary Lee!)

I have been enjoying Ryan’s clever, philosophical, rhyme-riddled, witty, and always-deeper-on-second-reading-than-they-seem-on-the-first poems.

The poem “How Birds Sing” caught my attention because a few times on our morning walks in the last weeks, we’ve been hearing spring birds sing. The Red-winged Blackbirds are back, and so is the bird that sings a lilting song I’ve always associated with spring. (Before I die, I will identify that bird!)

So, no matter how deep you still are in winter, comfort yourself that spring will soon be here, and keep your ears open!

Poetry Friday LogoThis post is part of Poetry Friday, hosted today by Renee at No Water River.

 
24 Comments

Posted by on February 6, 2014 in Nature, Poems by others

 

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Poetry and long-term friendship

Has poetry brought lovely, interesting, gifted people into your life? It has certainly done that for me.

My poet friend and memoirist Tracy Lee Karner (whom I’ve never met in person) posts a back-and-forth chat we had about poetry and our long-term friendship on her blog today. In it she interviews me and then answers some of my questions to her. (Lucky girl, spent a whole year studying with Patricia Fargnoli). The post is HERE.

 
6 Comments

Posted by on January 30, 2014 in People, Personal, Writing

 

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Two halves

pie

Two halves

A bigger half
is mathematician’s
impossibility.

But such a thing
when cutting pie
ever a probability.

© 2014 by Violet Nesdoly (All rights reserved)

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Today, January 23rd, is National Pie Day! I’m sure the Pie Council won’t have a problem with prolonging the celebrations into Poetry Friday.

The little poem (above) was one of my November poem-a-day efforts. Given my disability in the pie-cutting department, I’m thinking probably the best way to divvy up the pie, at least at my house, is to make individual pies for each person!

And here to help with your next pie party are some pie-making tips from the aforementioned Pie Council.

Poetry Friday LogoThis post is part of Poetry Friday, hosted today by Tara at A Teaching Life.

 
19 Comments

Posted by on January 23, 2014 in Light, Objects, Poetry Friday

 

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