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Dawson Trail Tanka (1)

Dawson Creek - Mile 0 of the Alaska Highway

Dawson Creek – Mile 0 of the Alaska Highway

We got back from our vacation in Dawson Creek, B.C. at the end of July. Dawson Creek is a town in northeast B.C. Near Alberta’s western boundary, it is Mile 0 of the Alaska Highway. Our daughter’s family moved there some months ago, and this was our second visit (the first was this winter/spring).

One of the things hubby and I like to do every day at home or on holiday is walk. Though I explored part of the Dawson Trail earlier in the snow, my broken hip brought an end to that. Now that I’m walking again and it’s summer, I was able to explore the full length of this trail that follows Dawson Creek’s meander through town.

Part of the trail is lined with granite boulders onto which poems have been engraved. I found eight of these. All the poems are tanka, celebrating the seasons, flowers, birds and critters of the area.

I’m posting four of these today and will do the next four in another post soon. I hope you enjoy this taste of the four seasons of northeast B.C.

Tanka stone in on Dawson Trail

Tanka stone on the Dawson Trail

Pussy WillowsPussy willows pop...

 

Canola fieldsThin wind carries grit

 

spider webAmber light suspends

 

winter - seed podssparrows

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I wish I knew who wrote these delightful poems. If I find out, I will certainly give credit.

Poetry Friday LogoThis post is linked to Poetry Friday, hosted today by Robyn Hood Black at Life on the Deckle Edge.

Oops, change of plans. Robyn is injured and so that Poetry Friday doesn’t have to go missing, Irene Latham at Live Your Poem has taken up the slack. Thank you, Irene!

 

 
 

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Ant

Ant on clematis flower

A clematis must look like a pink park to an ant!

Ant

“…the ants switched tasks. They switched in some directions but not in others. The general pattern is a flow of workers into foraging from all other tasks. The flow seems to originate with the nest maintenance workers, and once an ant leaves nest maintenance work, it will not go back.” – Deborah Gordon, Ants At Work, p. 126.

I have graduated
from feeding the pupae and the antlings
repairing and tidying
thoroughfares and tunnels
to the outside
(thank God I’m not a captive queen)
where I mount patrol
make rounds of Facebook, email, Twitter,
monitor technology and trends
forage freelance information
broadcast on the billboard of my blog.
But such a promotion
does not mean I get to skip
doing the domestic chores
in my egalitarian colony.

© 2014 by Violet Nesdoly

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Interesting creatures, ants! Smart too. Who would guess they have a work hierarchy.  Actually, I enjoy tending to the domestic chores of my little colony. Especially when there are antlings around!

Poetry Friday LogoThis poem is linked to Poetry Friday, hosted today by Heidi Mordhorst at My Juicy Little Universe.

 
10 Comments

Posted by on August 14, 2014 in Nature, People, Poetry Friday

 

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Holidays

Summer wildflowers

Summer wildflowers–more summer coins

Holidays

Another newly minted coin
rolls from the satin purse of night
adds yet more hours of wealth
to the collection
of summertime perfection.

© 2014 by Violet Nesdoly (All rights reserved)

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We’re recently back from holidays, which can sometimes feel other-worldly and too good to be true. We are also in the middle of a fabulous warm spell, with day after day of sunshine. I hope that you are also enjoying the rich abundance of summer!

You will also find me at Michelle Heidenrich Barnes’ blog Today’s Little Ditty with a haiku growing in her Haiku Garden. Thank you, Michelle for featuring my poem!

Poetry Friday LogoThis poem is linked to Poetry Friday, hosted today by the always-up-for-a-poem Mary Lee Hahn at A Year of Reading.

 
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Posted by on August 7, 2014 in Nature, Poetry Friday

 

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August

purple starfish

Purple starfish on a Salt Spring Island beach, August 2012 – Photo © 2014 by V. Nesdoly

August

Here already
—with your brown lawns and leggy baskets
blushing tomatoes and blackening berries,
hairy, husky ears of corn?

Your arrival means it’s time
for our last summer fling
on ferry boats to azure islands
where we’ll walk beaches
with nervous crickets and hungry wasps
hunt shells, snap starfish
read in the dappled shade

Back home I’ll shop with you
braving the hordes of moms and kids
with their lists of ruled and unruled,
Crayola and calculator,
for you are the time
to stock up on marked-down
Five Stars and boxes of Bic
gel technology and fluorescent sticky notes.

Before you slip away
we have a date to stand in line
for Super Dogs and the Musical Ride
the Logger Show and flying bikes.
Later with hands mini-donut cinnamon-scented
we’ll muscle our way through crowds
lined up for massages
from the back rub machine,
clotted in front of barkers
hawking magic cloths and unblackable pots
to the table of framable prints.

So hello, dear August.
though your coming caught me by surprise
please don’t be in a hurry to go
for you could never overstay
your welcome.

© 2014 by Violet Nesdoly (all rights reserved)

 
18 Comments

Posted by on August 1, 2014 in Nature, Personal

 

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Summer advice

Beach umbrella & hat at the beach

Summer Advice

Savor the moment
Let your mind wander
Only rise
When you’re good and ready

Don’t rush around
Or meet any deadlines
Wile away the day
No pressure

© 2014 by Violet Nesdoly (All rights reserved)

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It’s summer and I’m about to take my own advice. I will be taking a break from blogging here for a few weeks. I’ll be back sometime in August. Wishing you all sweet summer days.

Poetry Friday LogoThis post is linked to Poetry Friday, hosted today by Linda at Write Time.

 
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Posted by on July 10, 2014 in Acrostic, Light, Poetry Friday

 

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Writing

Beach pea and daisy

Writing

Beside the path
that winds through my
waking and sleeping,
grow, like wild flowers,
scenes, insights, connections.
Some days I am too rushed
or distracted to see.
On others I am wiser,
live with the perception
that gathers a bouquet,
chooses one or two
to press
between the covers
of a book.

© 2004 by Violet Nesdoly

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Today’s poem “Writing” is reposted from a first appearance here in 2010. Sad to say, I haven’t been picking or pressing many of those wildflowers lately because I’ve been engrossed in something else. The poem “Writing” is part of it.

CalendarYou see, I’ve been studying Mark Coker’s style guide on how to format documents for Smashwords. (In case you’re not familiar, Smashwords is a website through which you can publish and sell your own ebooks.)

I’ve wanted to try my hand at this kind of self-publishing for a while and decided to make my guinea pig document a chapbook that I first published in 2004 called Calendar. After spending several weeks snatching moments here and there to work on my document, this Monday I nervously hit “Publish.”

Amazingly the process completed without a hitch! And so today I’d like to introduce you to the 2014 ebook edition of Calendar!

Poetry Friday LogoNow to see what the rest of the Poetry Friday ladies and gents have been up to, click over to Buffy’s Blog where the lovely Buffy Silverman is laying out this week’s  Poetry Friday fare.

 

 

 

 
 

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Sock Hop

On Tuesday I took my walk after a heavy morning shower. On a section of the pathway beside the creek I saw snail after snail. There must have been 10 or more! I bet I know why they were out there.

Sock Hop poem with snail collage

 

In case you can’t read the fancy font:

Sock Hop

The downpour drumbeats on the whorls of rooftop
irresistible call to a rain dance sock hop

V. Nesdoly (all rights reserved)

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Snail Facts

For those more interested in facts than whimsy, here are a few snail facts (from Snail-world.com and About.com):

  • The trail of mucous a snail leaves behind is a lubricant to reduce friction against  the surfaces over which it travels. Snail mucous won’t make you sick.
  • A snail moves about 50 yards per hour or 1.3 cm. per second—slowly but steadily.
  • Snails can see and sense sound vibrations. Upper tentacles are the eyes, the lower ones pick up vibrations.
  • Snails are hermaphrodites, that is, they have both male and female parts. But they must mate with another snail to reproduce (lay eggs).
  • A snail’s lifespan (dependent on habitat and species) varies from 5 to even 25 years.
  • Snails are usually nocturnal and if they’re out during the day, don’t like bright sunshine (which is probably why they were out dancing on our cloudy Tuesday morning).

Poetry Friday Logo

This post is part of Poetry Friday, hosted this week by the effervescent Catherine at Catherine Johnson.

 
11 Comments

Posted by on June 12, 2014 in Kids, Light, Nature

 

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